Thomas Heatherwick, the designer of last year’s  London Olympics cauldron, has released plans for a Thames Bridge, linking Temple to Southbank in central London. One of his first projects was the spectacular rolling bridge in Paddington Basin; this latest bridge will be a grand garden bridge for TfL to improve pedestrian access. The actress Joanna Lumley is a big supporter of the garden concept: “This garden will be sensational in every way: a place with no noise or traffic where the only sounds will be birdsong and bees buzzing and the wind in the trees, and below the steady rush of water. It will be the slowest way to cross the river, as people will dawdle and lean on parapets and stare at the great cityscapes all around; but it will also be a safe and swift way for the weary commuter to make his way back over the Thames. There will be grasses, trees, wild flowers, and plants, unique to London’s natural riverside habitat. And there will be blossom in the spring and even a Christmas tree in mid-winter.  I believe it will bring to Londoners and visitors alike peace and beauty and magic.”

Depending on funding, the bridge could open as early as 2016.

Summer is here! Here are some lovely images featuring british wild birds ready to go on their holidays! by Luke J Albért.

Timothy Richards produces highly detailed architectural models using gypsum plaster in his workshop in Bath, England. His works include bookends, house and doorway models, special and limited edition models. His latest addition is a model of the V&A entrance in London, as seen in the first photograph. The complex entrance includes the statues of Queen Victoria above and Prince Albert below.

We adore these painted wooden sculptures by all-round talented illustrator and artist Merijn Hos. Hos, who is based in Utrecht in the Netherlands, divides his time between world class client work and personal projects, of which this is one.

To really appreciate the scale of this project, visit the beautifully simple website dedicated to it, which shows each and every sculpture he made in a grid format.

You should also view his impressive portfolio which includes vibrant and original collages and more commercial illustration projects.

Check out this amazing woodcut print by Tugboat Printshop.You can see underneath the five different coloured blocks that were laid down to create the image. The main (key) image is created by being drawn onto plywood, drawn over in pen and then carved out using hand held chisels and knives. Then this image is transferred onto the other 4 blocks which are then carved out to create the other colours. It seems like such painstaking work but the result looks worth it!

One of the most eagerly awaited exhibitions of the year opens at Tate Modern later this month - Lowry and the Painting of Modern Life.  This show will be the first of its kind to be held by a national public institution since the artist’s death in 1976.

Focusing on the best of Lowry’s urban scenes and industrial landscapes including Tate’s Coming Out of School 1927 and The Pond 1950 alongside significant loans, this timely and carefully selected exhibition aims to re-assess Lowry’s contribution to art history and to argue for his achievement as Britain’s pre-eminent painter of the industrial city.

As a modern painter Lowry wished to show what the industrial revolution had made of the world, yet his dominant status in British art coincided with a disappearance of the industrialised world he engaged with. The exhibition’s final room presents for the first time all eight of his less well known, late industrial panoramas, where a leap up to ‘history painting’ size indicates the measure of his final ambition. These large panoramic landscapes fall into two groups: the first, from the 1950s, are titled, with intentional generality, Industrial Landscapes. The second, less well known group was painted in the 1960s in the mining valleys of South Wales, the heartland of the Labour movement. In both the tone is valedictory.


Exhibition dates: 26 June to 20 October 2013. The Tate is expecting this to be very popular, so advance booking is recommended.

One of the most eagerly awaited exhibitions of the year opens at Tate Modern later this month - Lowry and the Painting of Modern Life.  This show will be the first of its kind to be held by a national public institution since the artist’s death in 1976.

Focusing on the best of Lowry’s urban scenes and industrial landscapes including Tate’s Coming Out of School 1927 and The Pond 1950 alongside significant loans, this timely and carefully selected exhibition aims to re-assess Lowry’s contribution to art history and to argue for his achievement as Britain’s pre-eminent painter of the industrial city.

As a modern painter Lowry wished to show what the industrial revolution had made of the world, yet his dominant status in British art coincided with a disappearance of the industrialised world he engaged with. The exhibition’s final room presents for the first time all eight of his less well known, late industrial panoramas, where a leap up to ‘history painting’ size indicates the measure of his final ambition. These large panoramic landscapes fall into two groups: the first, from the 1950s, are titled, with intentional generality, Industrial Landscapes. The second, less well known group was painted in the 1960s in the mining valleys of South Wales, the heartland of the Labour movement. In both the tone is valedictory.

Exhibition dates: 26 June to 20 October 2013. The Tate is expecting this to be very popular, so advance booking is recommended.

A tribute to Vespa, from 1943 to 2013: Vespalogy.

We love this. It helps if you sit back a bit and squint.

The installation Type Case is a low-resolution display with 125 rectangular pixels of different sizes. These are formed from the reflecting light of digitally controlled LEDs, embedded in each section of a European printers’ type case. Due to the standardized fragmentation of its compartments, the density of visual information is decreased towards the objects’ centre. Viewed close by, it is nearly impossible to recognize more than a flicker – however after moving some distance away, it becomes distinguishable, that the lights and shadows give a representation of the latest news headlines.

Click here for more information on the project and the artist Martin Bircher’s website

These installations are created using thousands of plastic straws by Francesca Pasquali.

Speaking about her work she says, “Even if plastic is a new material, the technique of interlacing it in preconstituted nets is connected to the past. It makes it live again in the shape of sculpture, which spreads out towards the space around, creating various texturised effects. Observing nature itself, I transfer the essential being of it. The interlacing forms transform the industrial material into soft and sensual shapes.”

(from junk-culture.com)

We love these cute parent/toddler shoes by Finnish duo “Company” Just perfect for dancing around the house in to keep little ones entertained whilst keeping us fit!
Check out their website to see more of their practical/fun products.
http://www.com-pa-ny.com/#

We love these cute parent/toddler shoes by Finnish duo “Company” Just perfect for dancing around the house in to keep little ones entertained whilst keeping us fit!

Check out their website to see more of their practical/fun products.

http://www.com-pa-ny.com/#