Check out this amazing woodcut print by Tugboat Printshop.You can see underneath the five different coloured blocks that were laid down to create the image. The main (key) image is created by being drawn onto plywood, drawn over in pen and then carved out using hand held chisels and knives. Then this image is transferred onto the other 4 blocks which are then carved out to create the other colours. It seems like such painstaking work but the result looks worth it!

One of the most eagerly awaited exhibitions of the year opens at Tate Modern later this month - Lowry and the Painting of Modern Life.  This show will be the first of its kind to be held by a national public institution since the artist’s death in 1976.

Focusing on the best of Lowry’s urban scenes and industrial landscapes including Tate’s Coming Out of School 1927 and The Pond 1950 alongside significant loans, this timely and carefully selected exhibition aims to re-assess Lowry’s contribution to art history and to argue for his achievement as Britain’s pre-eminent painter of the industrial city.

As a modern painter Lowry wished to show what the industrial revolution had made of the world, yet his dominant status in British art coincided with a disappearance of the industrialised world he engaged with. The exhibition’s final room presents for the first time all eight of his less well known, late industrial panoramas, where a leap up to ‘history painting’ size indicates the measure of his final ambition. These large panoramic landscapes fall into two groups: the first, from the 1950s, are titled, with intentional generality, Industrial Landscapes. The second, less well known group was painted in the 1960s in the mining valleys of South Wales, the heartland of the Labour movement. In both the tone is valedictory.


Exhibition dates: 26 June to 20 October 2013. The Tate is expecting this to be very popular, so advance booking is recommended.

One of the most eagerly awaited exhibitions of the year opens at Tate Modern later this month - Lowry and the Painting of Modern Life.  This show will be the first of its kind to be held by a national public institution since the artist’s death in 1976.

Focusing on the best of Lowry’s urban scenes and industrial landscapes including Tate’s Coming Out of School 1927 and The Pond 1950 alongside significant loans, this timely and carefully selected exhibition aims to re-assess Lowry’s contribution to art history and to argue for his achievement as Britain’s pre-eminent painter of the industrial city.

As a modern painter Lowry wished to show what the industrial revolution had made of the world, yet his dominant status in British art coincided with a disappearance of the industrialised world he engaged with. The exhibition’s final room presents for the first time all eight of his less well known, late industrial panoramas, where a leap up to ‘history painting’ size indicates the measure of his final ambition. These large panoramic landscapes fall into two groups: the first, from the 1950s, are titled, with intentional generality, Industrial Landscapes. The second, less well known group was painted in the 1960s in the mining valleys of South Wales, the heartland of the Labour movement. In both the tone is valedictory.

Exhibition dates: 26 June to 20 October 2013. The Tate is expecting this to be very popular, so advance booking is recommended.

These installations are created using thousands of plastic straws by Francesca Pasquali.

Speaking about her work she says, “Even if plastic is a new material, the technique of interlacing it in preconstituted nets is connected to the past. It makes it live again in the shape of sculpture, which spreads out towards the space around, creating various texturised effects. Observing nature itself, I transfer the essential being of it. The interlacing forms transform the industrial material into soft and sensual shapes.”

(from junk-culture.com)

Feast on some colour…We love these artworks by artist Andrea Dasha Reich. Reich predominantly builds her artwork using mixed media held in multi-layered resin, creating an eye-boggling and vibrant three dimensional depth to her work. Her website is a little tardy to navigate but there’s a good range of work on there and much more detailed personal biog. Easier to view is her 'Prints' website where you can buy limited edition reproductions of her work (from which these images are taken).

More info on the artist below, from here:

Andrea Dasha Reich was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, in a creative and progressive enviroment. Her Father was a lawyer and political activist and her mother was a graduate of the Academy of Applied Arts in Prague. She was raised in a Bauhaus designed apartment building filled with inspiring original artwork of that era. When her family relocated to Israel in 1960, Dasha studied art and design at the Bezalel Academy of Art in Jerusalem, under renowned modernist painters Yossi Stern and Moshe Rosenthalis.

After emigrating to the United States in 1966, Dasha enjoyed successful careers working in fashion design, accessories, home furnishing, textile design, tableware, and comercial space design. Her abstract paintings reflect her travels to Eastern and Western Europe, the Orient, the Middle East, and Mexico, and she draws inspiration from various aspects of our inter-connected, global culture. In addition she explains, “I find my inspiration from the original source of all textures, patterns, colors and contrasts - the natural world”. Believing that colors exerts continual feedback to the various layers of one’s consciousness, Dasha uses it profusely and excitingly.

Dasha’s luminously complex paintings are about the expressiveness of color. She playfully attacks her work with slashes, strokes, stripes, washes and drizzles of concentrated pigments. She then creates the illusion of glass by floating pigments, stains and metallic foils between deep, revealing layers of epoxy resin. You can see river currents, spiraling galaxies, river stones and flora silhouettes in her vibrant montages.

To celebrate the publication of Letters to Klaus, a wonderful 
collection of quirky illustrated envelopes sent to Andersen Press publisher Klaus Flugge by many of the best-known book illustrators working today, The Illustration Cupboard will be exhibiting a loan display of some of the  originals. From the looks of these, amazing with and creativity will be on display.

We love the work of American artist Jason LaFerrera, who painstakingly creates wonderful collages of birds and animals out of old maps.

Jason LaFerrera grew up in Richmond, Virgina where he began his career as a music producer, performer and recording engineer. He lived and worked in Marrakech, Morocco from 2006-2009, and is currently studying mathematics at Columbia University. His work has been featured in one-person and group exhibitions in New York, Richmond, and Nashville. 

Jason says: “The textures and contours of old maps are fascinating, even the tattered and stained parts. In this series, I digitally manipulate cartographic materials to create fauna and fowl in poses reminiscent of field guides from a similarly early era of publication. These idealized depictions created from recycled imagery question our relationship with the boundaries we draw to divide the natural world. The patterns of forests and shores often become an animal’s feathers or fur, while the rings of topography often trace out wings or antlers.”

reblog from arttickles:

Pierced ceramic basket, by Guillaume Delvigne and Ionna Vautrin

(via Guillaume Delvigne)

How cool are these ceramic baskets! I wonder if you could do a similar thing with regular weaved baskets painted white?

(via hellobiba)

This looks like quite an interesting and different sort of exhibition. Britain’s first Prime Minister, Sir Robert Walpole, amassed an amazing art collection which he displayed proudly in his country house, Houghton Hall in Norfolk in the first half of the 18th century. Unfortunately, Sir Robert’s grandson ran up huge debts and flogged the lot to Catherine the Great of Russia, where the collection formed the nucleus of the Hermitage collection. The sale caused a huge controversy in Britain, as even then the collection was regarded as of national importance. (Catherine the Great threw in a portrait of herself as part of the deal). To mark the 250th anniversary of Catherine’s accession to the throne, and to celebrate Anglo-Russian cultural relations, 70 of the paintings (including works by Poussin, Rembrandt and Van Dyck) are returning to Houghton Hall for this summer only. This is  the first time they have left Russia since they originally left Houghton.

The British summer seems to have stalled again (at least in London), so anyone requiring a strong dose of joyous colour should head to Gallery 8, which is showing for the next week the intense Scottish landscapes of John Lowrie Morrison: Jolomo.

John Lowrie Morrison has painted the west coast of Scotland since the early 1960’s. He paints the light of the west - the light that bathes the Inner & Outer Hebrides.

He uses strong colour to express that light and sees his paintings – not in the traditional chiaroscuro of light and dark -  but in darkness versus colour, which is what his painting is about: an allegorical description of the human spirit.

An arresting image to celebrate the joys of Spring, as we head into a (possibly, hopefully!) sunny Bank holiday weekend. 

The above watercolour was from an exhibition in 2012 organised by British artist Sarah Lucas, of art by Offenders, Secure Patients and Detainees. London: Spring Colours by Pierce Brunt (Highly Commended Award for Watercolour), HMP Full Sutton. Image courtesy of Koestler Trust.

An arresting image to celebrate the joys of Spring, as we head into a (possibly, hopefully!) sunny Bank holiday weekend. 

The above watercolour was from an exhibition in 2012 organised by British artist Sarah Lucas, of art by Offenders, Secure Patients and Detainees. London: Spring Colours by Pierce Brunt (Highly Commended Award for Watercolour), HMP Full Sutton. Image courtesy of Koestler Trust.